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13
JUN
2013

Do invasive species perform better in their new ranges?

The recently published Ecology article by our group is looking at the fundamental assumption in invasion biology that most invasive species have an advantage in their introduced range relative to their home ranges. Although it is widely assumed that species do better away than at home, this study shows that this is not always the case and a lot of species have similar performance in both introduced and native ranges.

Parker J.D., Torchin M.E., Hufbauer R.A., Lemoine N.P., Alba C., Blumenthal D.M., Bossdorf O., Byers J.E., Dunn A.M., Heckman R.W., Hejda M., Vojtěch J., Kanarek A.R., Martin L.B., Perkins S.E., Pyšek P., Schierenbeck K., Schlöder C., Van Klinken R., Vaughn K.J., Williams W., Wolfe L.M. 2013. Do invasive species perform better in their new ranges? Ecology 94(5): 985-994

 

The European Green Crab (Carcinus maenas) is amongst the 100 World's Worst Invadors. Here you can appreciate a size comparison between a native (Europe) and an introduced Green crab (San Francisco Bay, USA).

The European Green Crab (Carcinus maenas) is amongst the 100 World’s Worst Invadors. Here you can appreciate a size comparison between a native (Europe) and an introduced Green Crab (San Francisco Bay, USA).

Read more:

Full article in Ecology Journal

Science Daily

Smithsonian Newsletter (STRI News)